Talks On Psychoanalysis

shame

Episodes

Wednesday May 04, 2022

In this episode "Sublimation between suffering and pleasure at work", Christophe Dejours develops his theses on the psychodynamics of work, which he has particularly deepened. He examines the work clinic from the angle of sublimation, which he breaks down into «bodypropriation», relationship to the other and relationship to civilisation; sublimation operates in all work, even the most ordinary; it has a powerful effect on identity and mental health. Christophe Dejours shows how certain work organisations, by undermining the subjective springs of sublimation, can destabilise the individual and lead him to a psychological crisis or even to suicide. Finally, he shows how much, according to him, living work - that is to say work enriched by what the subject adds to the prescriptions to achieve objectives - plays an essential role in the structuring and destructuring of the social link.   Christophe Dejours is a psychiatrist, a psychoanalyst, a full member and Training Analyst of the French Psychoanalytical Association and a full member of the Institute of Psychosomatics of Paris, professor emeritus of the University of Paris Nanterre and president of the scientific council of the Jean Laplanche Foundation - Institute of France. Research on the frontiers of psychoanalysis: on the side of the biological sciences with psychosomatics and the metapsychology of the body. Worked with Pierre Marty and Michel Fain; on the side of the social sciences with the work clinic. Founded a new discipline: the psychodynamics of work taught in France and in several European countries, in Canada and in Latin America (Brazil, Argentina, Chile, Uruguay, Mexico) Research on sexual theory, in collaboration with Jean Laplanche (between 1997 and 2012), in particular on the introduction of gender in sexual theory, on dream work, on the formation of an unrepressed unconscious and a topicality of cleavage. He has written numerous articles and books, to name but a few: DEJOURS C. (2015): 'PSYCHOPATHOLOGY OF WORK: Clinical Observations', Karnac Books, London, 102 pages. DEJOURS C (2019): 'The Two Bodies: The Biological Body and the Erotic Body'. Psychoanalysis in Europe, 73: 16-27 DEJOURS C (2020): 'Psychoanalysis and the Genealogy of the Erogenous Body' Psychoanalysis.today, 12: The Body and Psychoanalysis. https://www.psychoanalysis.today/fr-FR/Home.aspx   Link to the paper https://docs.google.com/document/d/1BOOrx4U9wo-Z5IP7h4boMO5WnCHVJNtI/edit?usp=sharing&ouid=112457875385152358388&rtpof=true&sd=true   CREDITS This podcast series, published by the International Psychoanalytical Association, is part of the activities of the IPA Communication Committee and is produced by the IPA Podcast Editorial Team. Head of the Podcast Editorial Team is Gaetano Pellegrini. Editing and Post-Production: Massimiliano Guerrieri Music: Chopin_Waltzes_Op.69. Performer Olga Gurevich. https://musopen.org/music/4415-waltzes-op-69/ Cover Image: Office work, Harris Ewing photographer, 1936, United States. Courtesy Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division Washington, D.C. 20540 USA https://www.loc.gov/resource/hec.40970/   THIS EPISODE IS AVAILABLE ALSO IN FRENCH

Wednesday Mar 16, 2022

Thoreau's cove, Lake Walden, Concord, Mass., Detroit Publishing Co., publisher, between 1900 and 1910. Courtesy Library of Congress. Nancy Chodorow is Training and Supervising Analyst Emerita, Boston Psychoanalytic Society and Institute, Lecturer Part-time in Psychiatry at the Harvard Medical School/Cambridge Health Alliance, and Professor of Sociology Emerita, University of California, Berkeley.  At UC Berkeley, she helped to create Women's Studies and was a co-founder of the University of California Interdisciplinary Psychoanalytic Consortium.  She serves on the Holmes Commission on Racial Equality of the American Psychoanalytic Association and the Research Committee of the IPA, and she was recently Advisor to the Sexual and Gender Diversities Studies Committee of the IPA. Chodorow has written on psychoanalysis and feminism, Loewald and the Loewaldian tradition, and psyche and society, recently naming an American Independent Tradition, Intersubjective Ego Psychology, whose founding theorists are Loewald and Erikson. Her books include The Reproduction of Mothering; Feminism and Psychoanalytic Theory; Femininities, Masculinities, Sexualities; The Power of Feelings: Personal Meaning in Psychoanalysis, Gender and Culture; Individualizing Gender and Sexuality; and The Psychoanalytic Ear and the Sociological Eye: Toward an American Independent Tradition. Her books include The Reproduction of Mothering; Feminism and Psychoanalytic Theory; Femininities, Masculinities, Sexualities; The Power of Feelings: Personal Meaning in Psychoanalysis, Gender and Culture; Individualizing Gender and Sexuality; and The Psychoanalytic Ear and the Sociological Eye: Toward an American Independent Tradition. A book in her honor, Nancy Chodorow and The Reproduction of Mothering: 40 Years On (Bueskens, ed.) was published in 2020. Chodorow's podcast draws on her writings on individualizing gender and sexuality, masculinities, and Freud's social writings, and on her research on early women psychoanalysts.          

Sunday Nov 14, 2021

Themes of hiding abound in the developmental narratives of boys who grow up to be gay. Their need to hide is reinforced by the traumatizing public humiliation that ensues from either open expressions of same-sex desire or gender- nonconforming behavior. The experience of being discovered, punished, and humiliated for showing or acting on such feelings or behaviors can lead to hiding activities that persist long after the actual trauma is forgotten. When open expressions of same-sex intimacy are driven underground, clandestine and forbidden sexual activities, highly tinged with interpersonal anxiety, may become a significant mode of relatedness. This papers offers a clinical psychoanalytic approach for working with gay men that distinguishes the concept of sexual compulsion from that of sexual identity. Harry Stack Sullivan’s conceptualization of dissociative defenses is useful in clinically understanding and therapeutically working with gay men in general, and with sexually compulsive gay men in particular. This approach allows the sexual identities of gay men to be respected while addressing the compulsive behaviors that some of them find so troubling.   Jack Drescher is a psychiatrist and psychoanalyst in private practice in New York City, a Clinical Professor of Psychiatry at Columbia University and a Faculty Member of their Psychoanalytic program and their Division of Gender, Sexuality and Health. He is an adjunct Professor at the New York University Postdoctoral Program in Psychotherapy and Psychoanalysis and a Training and Supervising Analyst at the William Alanson White Institute. He also serves as a consultant to IPA’s Committee on Gender and Sexual Diversity.   SELECTED PRESENTATIONS AND PUBLICATIONS  Reed GM, *Drescher J, Krueger RB, Atalla E, Cochran SD, First MB, Cohen-Kettenis PT, et al. Revising the ICD-10 Mental and Behavioural Disorders classification of sexuality and gender identity based on current scientific evidence, best clinical practices, and human rights considerations. World Psychiatry, 15:205–221.                                                                    Drescher J, Schwartz A, Casoy, F, McIntosh CA, Hurley, B, Ashely K, et al: The growing regulation of conversion therapy. Journal of Medical Regulation, 102(2):7-12. Drescher J, Cohen-Kettenis PT, Reed GM: Gender incongruence of childhood in the ICD-11: Controversies, proposal, and rationale. Lancet Psychiatry, 2016, 3:297-304. Drescher J, Cohen-Kettenis PT, Winter S: Minding the body: Situating gender diagnoses in the ICD-11. International Review of Psychiatry, 2012, 24(6): 568–577. Drescher J: Queer diagnoses: Parallels and contrasts in the history of homosexuality, gender variance, and the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual (DSM). Archives of Sexual Behavior, 2010, 39:427–460.  

Thursday Nov 05, 2020

In this episode, Claudio Neri presents his article on "Vitality, Vitalism and Shame". Through a rich narrative, ranging from the memory of his encounter with Bion, to ethnopsychological studies on expressions of anger or joy, to the Myth of Anteo that shows the importance of contact with a safe and revitalizing object, Claudio Neri raises two questions: how can we distinguish natural vitality from exasperated vitalism? And what role does shame play in this presenting itself to others without the armor of one's own defenses? If enthusiasm is contagious, it is possible, however, to observe how sometimes some individuals may not tolerate being close to a vital subject.  The contagion effect, which emanates from the enthusiastic person, in fact puts them at risk of losing their balance. People who are depressed or very controlling, for example, may feel that the enthusiasm activates an aspect of themselves that they must strictly keep at bay. What should the psychoanalyst finally do when the shame and the parade of embarrassment and fear are so intense as to prevent one of his patients from approaching vitalizing experiences?   Claudio Neri, MD, is Training and Supervising Analyst at the Italian Psychoanalytic Society, a founder member of the International Field Theory Association. He is also a member of the the editorial board of the “European Journal of Psychotherapy and Counselling”;  “Revue de Psychothérapie Psychanalytique de Groupe”;  “Clínica y Análisis Grupal” and of the “Revista de Psicoànalisis de las Configuraciones Vinculares”. He has published articles and books, primarily on the tecnique and theory of treatment. His work has been translated into six languages. link to the paper https://drive.google.com/file/d/1LI_Qi9es_zCAPUc_uoFetrzy9-0XOf-i/view?usp=sharing     This episode is read by Brook Barbieri. https://www.claudioneri.it   This episode is available also in Italian, Spanish, French.

Thursday Oct 29, 2020

In this episode Dr. Kenichiro Okano displays how shame and social phobia could manifest differently between the Eastern and the Western countries, and investigates them from a psychoanalytical point of view. With his personal history of becoming a bicultural psychiatrist and psychoanalyst in the United States and in Japan, he considers that while passivity and non-action induced by shame can be misunderstood in Western culture, it can potentially exert some paradoxical power and influence, at least in the Japanese society. In its conceptualizations, the dissociation construct plays a central role, consistent with its research and clinical experience.  Dr Kenichiro Okano is a Japanese psychiatrist and psychoanalyst, and professor of Clinical Psychology at Kyoto University Department of Education. He is a training and supervising analyst in the Japan Psychoanalytic Society. He is the author of 26 books on psychoanalysis, dissociative disorder, and neurobiology. In 2016 he won The Japanese Psychoanalytical Association’s Distinguished Publications Award. This episode is availablealso in Japanese

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