Talks On Psychoanalysis

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Episodes

Monday Apr 04, 2022

"Guernica" by Picasso at MOMA, NYC. Gotfryd, Bernard, photographer. Courtesy Library of Congress. What happens when our basic trust in the world is challenged, and the social dimension of reality is disrupted as a consequence of collective trauma?In this episode, Werner Bohleber addresses the theme of traumatic experiences and does so starting from the two main models around which psychoanalytic thought has sought to understand trauma: the freudian psycho-economic model and the object-relational model.Reflecting on what he so effectively defines as "the symbolic web that carries us", Bohleber considers the implications of man-made disasters, and those that befall our individual and collective memory.   Werner Bohleber, Dr. phil, is a psychoanalyst in private practice in Frankfurt am Main. He is training analyst and former President of the German Psychoanalytical Association. He has long served on committees of the IPA, the last from 2009-2013 as Chair of the IPA Committee on Conceptual Integration. From 1997 to 2017 he was main editor of the journal PSYCHE.  His research subjects and main publication themes are: late adolescence and young adulthood; psychoanalytic theory; transgenerational consequences of the Nazi period and the war on the second and third generation; nationalism, terrorism, anti-Semitism; trauma research. In 2007, he was awarded the Mary S. Sigourney Award for his diverse contributions, especially those relating to the traumatic aftermath of the Holocaust, National Socialism, and World War II.   link to the paper https://docs.google.com/document/d/18yMyiZ6darmN6ouxVoQmUwlci44UCnCQ/edit?usp=sharing&ouid=112457875385152358388&rtpof=true&sd=true   this episode is available also in German   Bibliography Allen, J. (2013). Mentalizing in the development and treatment of attachment trauma. London: Karnac. Amery J. (1996): Die Tortur. Merkur, 50, 502-515. Balint M (1969). Trauma and object relationship. Int. J. Psycho-Anal. 50: 429-36. Baranger M, Baranger W, Mom JM (1988). The infantile psychic trauma from us to Freud: Pure trauma, retroactivity and reconstruction. Int. J. Psycho-Anal. 69: 113-28. Bohleber, W (2010). Destructiveness, Intersubjectivity, and Trauma. The Identity Crisis of Modern Psychoanalysis. London: Karnac. Cooper, A. (1986), Toward a limited definition of psychic trauma. In: The Reconstruction of Trauma. Its Significance in Clinical Work, ed. A. Rothstein. Madison, CT: International Universities Press,  pp. 41-56. Erikson E.H. (1968):  Identity. Youth and crisis. Nem York: Norton. Ferenczi S (1949). Confusion of the tongues between the adults and the child [1933]. Int. J. Psycho-Anal. 30: 225-30. Freud S (1920). Beyond the pleasure principle. Standard Edition 18, p. 7-64 Freud S (1926). Inhibitions, symptoms and anxiety. Standard Edition 20, p. 77-174. Freud S. (1939). Moses and Monotheistism. SE 23: 1-138. (GW 16: 103–246) Garland, C. (1998). Thinking about trauma. In: Garland, C. (Hg.). Understanding trauma. A psychoanalytic approach. London (Karnac). Krystal, H. (1988). Integration and  Self-Healing. Affect, Trauma, Alexithymia. Hillsdale: Analytic Press. Langer L.L. (1995): Memory’s time: Chronology and duration in Holocaust testimonies. In:  Langer, L.L.: Admitting the Holocaust: Collected essays. New York/Oxford: John Hopkins University Press, pp.13-23.  Leys R. (2000). Trauma: A genealogy. Chicago, Ill.: University of Chicago Press. Morris D. J. (2015):  The evil hours. A biography of post-traumatic stress disorder. Boston/New York: Houghton Mifflin Harcourt. Oliner M. (2012): Psychic reality in context. Perspectives on psychoanalysis, personal history, and trauma. London: Karnac  Shalev A.Y. (1996), Stress Versus Traumatic stress. From Acute Homeostatic Reactions to Chronic Psychopathology. In: Traumatic Stress. The Effects of Overwhelming Experience on Mind, Body and Society, ed. B. van der Kolk, A., Mc Farlane & L.Weisaeth. New York NY: Guilford Press, pp. 77-101. Steele BF (1994). Psychoanalysis and the maltreatment of children. J. Amer. Psychoanal. Assn. 42: 1001-25. Van der Kolk B. (1996). Trauma and memory. In: B. van der Kolk, B., A. McFarlane & L. Weisath (Eds.) Traumatic stress. The effects of overwhelming experience on mind, body and society.  New York: Guilford Press, pp. 279-302. van der Kolk B. (2014): The body keeps the score. Mind, brain, and the body in the healing of trauma London: Penguin Books.   CREDITSEditing: Agustín Ruiz Brussain

Thursday Sep 23, 2021

What is the role of external reality in the formation of traumatic experiences? And how much does this still determine the overcoming of the profound dysphoria that affects certain individuals? With a highly personal and original view on the functioning of the mind from a psychoanalytic perspective, Marion Oliner accompanies us in this episode through a reflection on the impact of catastrophic events on the lives of individuals and th eir descendants. Through her voice we will encounter Diderot, Proust and Baudelaire, Grubrich-Simitis and Winnicott; the tragedy of Nazism and the memorable beauty of the vineyards along the Rhine. Marion M. Oliner has been active in her private practice, teaching, supervising, as a speaker, and as a member of many committees, as well as in the governance of the New York Freudian Society. She is a member of the International Psychoanalytic Association and on the faculty of the New York Freudian Society, the National Psychological Association for Psychoanalysis, and the Metropolitan Institute for Psychoanalytic Psychotherapy.   This episode is inspired by the book published in 2018 by Routledge, titled: "Psychoanalytic Studies on Dysphoria: The False Accord in the Divine Symphony". link to the paper https://drive.google.com/file/d/1jUQ7U0ZAVNUS5TsWjxkCfv1UqDuJWG36/view?usp=sharing   Sunset on the Rhine, 1853. Barend Cornelis Koekkoek. Courtesy Met Museum, New York.

Tuesday Jun 29, 2021

Interpretation of Dreams, by  Rod Moss   Craig San Roque, community  psychologist and psychotherapist has, for the past 30 years lived in Central Australia  working within indigenous Australian circumstances. He has written many careful accounts of the existential realities of intercultural  collaborations and tensions.  Trained in London, with the Society for Analytical Psychology, he cautiously adapts and applies psychoanalytic insights to help negotiate the rough environment of Aboriginal/white Australian relations.Mourning Melancholia and The Echo Effect - on  aspects of  unconscious transference within black/white relations -  is distilled from experience in a project co-developed with indigenous friends who are part of the  Central Australian  NPY Women’s Council,  Uti Kulintjaku/Clear Thinking project, initiated by traditional healers (Ngangkari).   The Passion, by  Rod Moss References to the Uti Kulintjaku projects, including evaluations by Samantha Togni  may be found through the NPY Women’s Council website - npywc.org.au - see  section on Ngangkari-traditional healers and Uti Kulintjaku project.NPY Women’s Council is an Anangu led organisation that delivers heath, social and cultural services in the Ngaanyatjarra Pitjantjatjara Yankunytjatjara (NPY) region of Central Australia. Link to the paper https://drive.google.com/file/d/1vCDPRxFRbe11hJh-N8pQzhE0fV7p-2tI/view?usp=sharing    

Tuesday Dec 08, 2020

In today’s episode, we’ll listen to Gregorio Kohon’s work on “Monuments and Denials: Creating and Re-creating History”, that follows on from his book on Reflections on the Aesthetic Experience - Psychoanalysis and the Uncanny. It is argued that denials are daily events at all levels of human existence. Denials can also work in a negative way: memories, for example, can create events that might have never occurred; even if not true, mnemic inventions may still make sense and become meaningful. Historical and religious monuments are a case in point. They are political statements which work through denials, not always representing historical “truth”. Gregorio Kohon is a Training Analyst from the British Psychoanalytical Society. He lived in Australia, where he co-founded (together with Valli Shaio Kohon) The Brisbane Centre for Psychoanalytic Studies. He published No Lost Certainties to be Recovered; Reflections on the Aesthetic Experience - Psychoanalysis and the Uncanny, and Considering the Nature of Psychoanalysis. He edited The British School of Psychoanalysis - The Independent Tradition; The Dead Mother - The Work of André Green; and British Psychoanalysis - New Perspectives in the Independent Tradition. He edited, together with Rosine Perelberg, The Greening of Psychoanalysis, and co-authored with André Green, Love and its Vicissitudes. His works have been translated into many languages. He is also a poet and a novelist.    Reflections on the Aesthetic Experience - Psychoanalysis and the Uncanny,Routledge (2015).   This episode is available also in Spanish

International Psychoanalytical Association

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